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UNHCR chief calls on EU to harmonize asylum systems

News Stories, 28 March 2008

© UNHCR/M.Sunjic
High Commissioner Guterres (left) with Slovenian Foreign Minister Dimitrij Rupel. Talks in Slovenia took place in a friendly and constructive atmosphere.

LJUBLJANA, Slovenia, March 28 (UNHCR) UN High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres has stressed the need for a harmonized asylum system in European Union countries.

Guterres, meeting with senior Slovenian officials here on Wednesday, said current inconsistencies between national asylum systems compelled people to move around the EU in search of protection.

When up to 90 percent of Iraqis seeking asylum in Sweden are recognized and zero percent get protection in Greece, they will move accordingly, Guterres explained. The lack of a harmonized asylum system encouraged asylum seekers to disappear from one country and move on to another.

The High Commissioner noted that in the public opinion this search for protection was interpreted as an abuse of the system, adding that this was not the case.

Guterres called for swift harmonization, but he cautioned that the EU should not neglect the quality of the asylum system: "Europe has a common space and common borders, but the only thing that is common in the asylum system is a drift towards minimum standards," he said. In this regard, he called for improvements in the asylum system in Slovenia as well.

The High Commissioner said it was vital that people in need of protection had access to EU territory. He cited the Spanish Canary Islands in the Atlantic and Italy's Lampedusa Island in the Mediteranean as examples of "impeccable cooperation" between UNHCR, concerned governments and NGOs in managing difficult mixed population movements.

During his one-day visit, Guterres held talks with President Danilo Türk, Foreign Minister Dimitrij Rupel, Interior Minister Dragutin Mate and National Assembly Vice-President Vasja Klavora, with whom he launched a Slovenian version of the Handbook for Parliamentarians on Statelessness and Nationality. He also met refugee NGOs and spoke with asylum seekers.

By Melita H. Sunjic in Ljubljana, Slovenia




UNHCR country pages

Asylum and Migration

Asylum and Migration

All in the same boat: The challenges of mixed migration around the world.

Refugee Protection and Mixed Migration: A 10-Point Plan of Action

A UNHCR strategy setting out key areas in which action is required to address the phenomenon of mixed and irregular movements of people. See also: Schematic representation of a profiling and referral mechanism in the context of addressing mixed migratory movements.

International Migration

The link between movements of refugees and broader migration attracts growing attention.

Mixed Migration

Migrants are different from refugees but the two sometimes travel alongside each other.

The High Commissioner

António Guterres, who joined UNHCR on June 15, 2005, is the UN refugee agency's 10th High Commissioner.

Arriving in Europe, refugees find chaos as well as kindness

Each day, thousands of refugees and migrants are risking everything to make the perilous journey to Europe. The majority - who come from war-torn Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan - are passing through Greece and then making their way to Germany. Transit countries have been overwhelmed by the influx, but volunteers and NGOs are stepping in to provide support along the route. In Hungary, where there is a large bottleneck of people trying to make their way onwards to places like Germany, UNHCR is mobilizing relief items, including tents, plastic sheets and thermal blankets. The refugee agency is also calling on officials there to streamline the registration process and allow humanitarian organizations to provide swift assistance to those in greatest need. UNHCR is also calling on EU Member States to work together to strengthen emergency reception, assistance and registration efforts in the countries most impacted by arrivals, particularly Greece, Hungary and Italy. UNHCR photographers have been on hand documenting the arduous journey.

Arriving in Europe, refugees find chaos as well as kindness

The Children of Harmanli Face a Bleak Winter

Since the Syrian crisis began in March 2011, more than 2 million people have fled the violence. Many have made their way to European Union countries, finding sanctuary in places like Germany and Sweden. Others are venturing into Europe by way of Bulgaria, where the authorities struggle to accommodate and care for some 8,000 asylum-seekers, many of whom are Syrian. More than 1,000 of these desperate people, including 300 children, languish in an overcrowded camp in the town of Harmanli, 50 kilometres from the Turkish-Bulgarian border. These people crossed the border in the hope of starting a new life in Europe. Some have travelled in family groups; many have come alone with dreams of reuniting in Europe with loved ones; and still others are unaccompanied children. The sheer number of people in Harmanli is taxing the ability of officials to process them, let alone shelter and feed them. This photo essay explores the daily challenges of life in Harmanli.

The Children of Harmanli Face a Bleak Winter

George Dalaras

George Dalaras

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Italy: Maya's Song

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