UNHCR mourns death of Syrian refugees killed in fire

Press Releases, 17 January 2013

UNHCR today expressed its sadness at the death of seven Syrian refugees in a fire at a transit centre in the Jordanian border town of Ramtha. Six of the dead were children.

The victims were all members of the same family and were sleeping in prefabricated housing when it was engulfed by fire on Wednesday night. Four survivors were rushed from the King Abdullah Park transit centre to the nearest hospital, where they are being treated for burns and smoke inhalation.

Initial investigations by the local authorities indicate that the fire was started by a kerosene heater.

The King Abdullah Park transit centre hosts more than 900 Syrian refugees, all housed in prefabricated shelters.

These deaths are heartbreaking for the humanitarian community in Jordan. The loss of children was particularly tragic.

UNHCR and its partners in Jordan have regular fire-awareness campaigns in all transit camps in Jordan, as well as at the main camp at Za'atri.

For further information please contact:

  • Aoife McDonnell: mcdonnel@unhcr.org, mobile: +962 795 450 379
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