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Annotated Agenda (submitted by the High Commissioner)
EC/SC.2/74

Administrative and Financial Matters (SCAF), 18 August 1995

1. Adoption of the agenda

2. Report on the work of the inter-sessional meetings of the Sub-Committee, including the adoption of the draft report of the 20 June 1995 Meeting

The Chairman of the Sub-Committee will make an oral report on the work of the inter-sessional meetings. The Sub-Committee will have before it the reports of its 16 January 1995 and 4 April 1995 meetings (EC/SC.2/72, EC/SC.2/73 respectively), as well as the Report on the Informal Consultations on Budgetary Questions Conclusions and Related Documentation (EC/SC.2/75) adopted by the 20 June meeting. In addition, the Sub-Committee will be invited to adopt the draft report of its 20 June 1994 meeting (EC/1995/SC.2/CRP.25).

3. Update on programmes and funding

The Sub-Committee will consider the following documents: Update on Programmes and Funding (A/AC.96/845/Part I/Add.1); Proposal to Create a Post of Assistant High Commissioner (Policy, Planning and Operations) (A/AC.96/846/Part VII/Add.1); and Education Account (EC/SC.2/81).

Also of relevance to the discussion under this item is the following documentation for the plenary of the forty-sixth session of the Executive Committee: A/AC.96/846 (UNHCR Programmes: Part I, Africa; Part II, Asia and Oceania; Part III, Europe; Part IV, Americas and the Caribbean; Part V, South West Asia, North Africa and the Middle East; Part VI, Other Programmes; and Part VII, Headquarters); A/AC.96/845 (Overview of UNHCR Activities: Part I, Consolidated Programmatic, Budgetary and Financial Information; Part II, Field and Headquarters: Programmatic, Budgetary and Financial Information; and Part III, Background Information on Humanitarian Assistance Policy, Programmes, Administrative and Financial Matters); A/AC.96/854 (UNHCR Activities Financed from Voluntary Funds: Report for 1994-1995 and Proposed Budget for 1996 Report of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions); A/AC.96/849 (Report on the Status of Contributions to UNHCR Voluntary Funds as of 31 May 1995).

4. Programme Policy Issues

The Sub-Committee will consider a number of programme policy issues, which will be taken up in the following two clusters:

A. (i) Refugee Women

The Sub-Committee will have before it EC/SC.2/77 (Refugee Women: the Achievements and the Challenges).

(ii) Refugee Children

The Sub-Committee will consider EC/SC.2/78 (Implementation of UNHCR's Policy and Guidelines on Refugee Children)

(iii) Refugee Health

The Sub-Committee will consider EC/SC.2/CRP.29 (Refugee Health)

B. (i) Refugees and the environment

The Sub-Committee will have before it EC/SC.2/79 (Progress Report on the Guidelines on Refugees and the Environment).

(ii) Emergency Response

The Sub-Committee will have before it conference room paper EC/1995/SC.2/CRP.28 (Information Note on Emergency Preparedness and Response).

5. Administrative, financial and human resources issues

(a) Voluntary Funds accounts for the year 1994 and Report of the Board of Auditors thereon

The Sub-Committee will have before it the following documents to facilitate its consideration of this item: A/AC.96/848 (Voluntary Funds administered by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees: Accounts for the year 1994); A/AC.96/853 (Report of the Board of Auditors to the General Assembly on the Accounts of the Voluntary Funds Administered by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees for the Year ended 31 December 1994); and A/AC.96/853/Add.1 (Report of the Advisory Committee for Administrative and Budgetary Questions to the General Assembly at its 50th Session (extract)).

(b) Human Resources Management

The Sub-Committee will have before it a Progress Report on UNHCR's Career Management System (EC/1995/SC.2/CRP.26).

(c) Implementing partners

The Sub-Committee will consider EC/1995/SC.2/CRP.27 (UNHCR and its Implementing Partners)

6. Executive Committee Working Methods

Under this item, the Sub-Committee will consider the Report of the Working Group on Executive Committee Working Methods (EC/SC.2/76) with a view to transmitting recommendations to the plenary for adoption. It will also have before it a Note on the Introduction of Russian as an Official Language of the Executive Committee (EC/SC.2/80).

7. Any other business

8. Adoption of the draft report of the Sub-Committee on Administrative and Financial Matters to the Executive Committee

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Barbara Hendricks marks 25 years with UNHCR

Acclaimed soprano Barbara Hendricks has spent a quarter-of-a-century helping UNHCR to spread awareness about refugees and lobbying on their behalf with politicians and governments. She was named a UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador in 1987 and, in 2002, was appointed Honorary Lifetime Goodwill Ambassador in recognition of her long service for the refugee agency.

In 2012, UNHCR celebrates this landmark 25th anniversary with a ceremony in the Geneva headquarters of the refugee agency. In her years with UNHCR, Hendricks has performed fund-raising concerts, met policymakers and government leaders in Europe, Asia and Africa and been on more than a dozen visits to the field, meeting the forcibly displaced around the world. UNHCR salutes its longest serving Goodwill Ambassador.

Barbara Hendricks marks 25 years with UNHCR

Cold, Uncomfortable and Hungry in Calais

For years, migrants and asylum-seekers have flocked to the northern French port of Calais in hopes of crossing the short stretch of sea to find work and a better life in England. This hope drives many to endure squalid, miserable conditions in makeshift camps, lack of food and freezing temperatures. Some stay for months waiting for an opportunity to stow away on a vehicle making the ferry crossing.

Many of the town's temporary inhabitants are fleeing persecution or conflict in countries such as Afghanistan, Eritrea, Iraq, Sudan and Syria. And although these people are entitled to seek asylum in France, the country's lack of accommodation, administrative hurdles and language barrier, compel many to travel on to England where many already have family waiting.

With the arrival of winter, the crisis in Calais intensifies. To help address the problem, French authorities have opened a day centre as well as housing facilities for women and children. UNHCR is concerned with respect to the situation of male migrants who will remain without shelter solutions. Photographer Julien Pebrel recently went to Calais to document their lives in dire sites such as the Vandamme squat and next to the Tioxide factory.

Cold, Uncomfortable and Hungry in Calais

Forced to grow up too soon in Lebanon: Mahmoud

Mahmoud,15, hasn't been to school in 3 years. In his native Syria, his parents were afraid to send him because of the civil war. They ended up fleeing a year ago when, in the early morning hours, a bomb fell on a nearby house. The family, still groggy from being jolted awake, grabbed what they could and fled to Lebanon. Their home and the local school have since been destroyed.

In Lebanon, Mahmoud's father is unable to find work and now the family can barely afford rent.

A month ago, Mahmoud started working for tips cleaning fish at a small shop next to his home. He makes about $60 USD a month. With this money he helps pay rent on his family's tiny underground room, shared between his parents and eight brothers and sisters. Mahmoud is proud to help his family but with the fish shop located in the same subterranean structure as his home, he barely goes out into the sunshine.

Children like Mahmoud, some as young as seven, often work long hours for little pay, and in some cases in dangerous conditions. These children forfeit their future by missing out on an education and the carefree years of childhood. Many are also traumatized by what they witnessed back in Syria.

UNHCR and its partners together with local governments are providing financial assistance to help vulnerable Syrian refugee families cover expenses like rent and medical care, which means there is less need to pull children out of school and put them to work. UN agencies and their partners have also established case management and referral systems in Jordan and Lebanon to identify children at risk and refer them to the appropriate services.

Forced to grow up too soon in Lebanon: Mahmoud