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For teachers - ages 9-11 Geography: Activity Sheet: Refugees - Who, Where and Why?

Teaching Tools, 5 April 2007

"Refugees are people who flee their country because of a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership of a particular social group. A refugee either cannot return home, or is afraid to do so."

  • Using a dictionary, find the meanings of the following words:

    flee

    …………………………………………………… …………………………………………

    persecution

    …………………………………………………… …………………………………………

    race

    …………………………………………………… …………………………………………

    religion

    …………………………………………………… …………………………………………

    nationality

    …………………………………………………… …………………………………………

    civil war

    …………………………………………………… …………………………………………

    asylum

    …………………………………………………… …………………………………………

  • a) Give an example of a conflict that has happened in the 1990s that has caused people to flee from their home and country.

    …………………………………………………… …………………………………………

  • b) Where have the people fled to?

    …………………………………………………… …………………………………………

  • c) What caused the people to flee?

    …………………………………………………… …………………………………………

    …………………………………………………… …………………………………………

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