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Health Information System Training Materials

Health, January 2010

Presentations, exercise work and answers related to each HIS module are available for download below.

Introduction

Module 1: Population

Module 2: Mortality

Module 3: Morbidity

Module 4: IPD and Referral

  • Presentation
  • Exercises
  • Answers

Module 5: Laboratory

  • Presentation
  • Exercises
  • Answers

Module 6: Disease Control

  • Presentation
  • Exercises
  • Answers

Module 7: EPI and Vitamin A

Module 8: Nutrition

Module 9: Reproductive Health

Module 10: HIV/AIDS

Other


Download the HIS Training Materials, including the MS PowerPoint presentations, in zipped format: UNHCR Health Information System (HIS) Training Materials (36.1Mb)

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Public Health Data

Learn how UNHCR collects and uses public health data in refugee settings.

Frequently Asked Questions about the Health Information System

Updated information on 2009 HIS toolkits and other user support questions.

Health Information System CD-ROM

To order a CD-ROM containing HIS tools and resource materials, please write to us here: E-mail HIS

Matiop's First Days as a Refugee in Uganda

After fighting engulfed his hometown of Bor in South Sudan last December, Matiop Atem Angang fled with his extended family of 15 - including his 95-year-old mother, his six children and his sister's family. They left the capital of Jonglei state, one of the areas worst affected by the violence of the last two months. A one-week journey by boat and truck brought them to safety in neighbouring Uganda.

At the border, Matiop's large family was taken to a UNHCR-run transit centre, Dzaipi, in the northern district of Adjumani. But with thousands of South Sudanese refugees arriving every day, the facility quickly became overcrowded. By mid-February, the UN refugee agency had managed to transfer refugees to their own plots of land where they will be able to live until it is safe for them to go home. Uganda is one of very few countries that allow refugees to live like local citizens. These photos follow Matiop through the process of registering as a refugee in Uganda - an experience he shares with some 70,000 of his compatriots.

Matiop's First Days as a Refugee in Uganda

Forced to grow up too soon in Lebanon: Mahmoud

Mahmoud,15, hasn't been to school in 3 years. In his native Syria, his parents were afraid to send him because of the civil war. They ended up fleeing a year ago when, in the early morning hours, a bomb fell on a nearby house. The family, still groggy from being jolted awake, grabbed what they could and fled to Lebanon. Their home and the local school have since been destroyed.

In Lebanon, Mahmoud's father is unable to find work and now the family can barely afford rent.

A month ago, Mahmoud started working for tips cleaning fish at a small shop next to his home. He makes about $60 USD a month. With this money he helps pay rent on his family's tiny underground room, shared between his parents and eight brothers and sisters. Mahmoud is proud to help his family but with the fish shop located in the same subterranean structure as his home, he barely goes out into the sunshine.

Children like Mahmoud, some as young as seven, often work long hours for little pay, and in some cases in dangerous conditions. These children forfeit their future by missing out on an education and the carefree years of childhood. Many are also traumatized by what they witnessed back in Syria.

UNHCR and its partners together with local governments are providing financial assistance to help vulnerable Syrian refugee families cover expenses like rent and medical care, which means there is less need to pull children out of school and put them to work. UN agencies and their partners have also established case management and referral systems in Jordan and Lebanon to identify children at risk and refer them to the appropriate services.

Forced to grow up too soon in Lebanon: Mahmoud

Syria Crisis Third Anniversary: A Child of the Conflict

Ashraf was born the very day the Syria conflict began: March 15, 2011. He is the seventh child in a family from Homs. Within a week of his birth, the conflict arrived in his neighbourhood. For months his family rarely left the house. Some days there was non-stop bombing, others were eerily quiet. On the quiet days, Ashraf's mother made a run with him to the local health clinic for vaccinations and check-ups.

When Ashraf was about 18 months old, his aunt, uncle and cousin were murdered - their throats slit - as the boy slept nearby in his family's home. Terrified that they were next, Ashraf's family crammed into their car, taking a few precious belongings, and drove to the border.

They left behind their home, built by Ashraf's father and uncle. Within days the house was looted and destroyed. Photographer Andrew McConnell visited the family at their new home, in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley, which was also built by Ashraf's father and uncle. Located on the edge of a muddy field, it is a patchwork of plastic sheeting, canvas and scrap metal. The floor is covered with blankets and mattresses from UNHCR. They now face new challenges such as the daily battle to keep the children warm, dry and protected from rats. Ashraf still starts at sudden loud noises, but the doctor told his mother that the boy would get used to it.

Syria Crisis Third Anniversary: A Child of the Conflict

South Sudan: Food Security Play video

South Sudan: Food Security

Jacob is plowing 20 kilometers far from his own home town, Bor, after having to abandon it due to the ongoing fighting in South Sudan. Now in Mingkaman camp,as a displaced person, this land he plows is all he has after losing farm and cattle back home
Jordan: Sameh's Struggle with CancerPlay video

Jordan: Sameh's Struggle with Cancer

Sameh was only three when he was found to have a brain tumour. In Syria, he was able to get regular treatment. Now he is a refugee in Jordan and it is more difficult, but UNHCR has been helping the boy who longs to play with his friends and go back home.
Jordan: A Young Boy's BurdenPlay video

Jordan: A Young Boy's Burden

Ibrahim has suffered too much for an 11-year-old. His mother and 3 siblings were killed by a bomb in Damascus, which left the Syrian boy with bad injuries. With the help of doctors in Jordan's Za'atari refugee camp, he hopes to once more walk unaided.