German artist gives masterclass to Syrian refugee children in Iraq

News Stories, 17 December 2013

© UNHCR/W.Spindler
Graphic artist Reinhard Kleist giving an art workshop to Syrian refugee children in the Kawergosk refugee camp in northern Iraq.

ERBIL, Iraq, December 16 (UNHCR) Award-winning graphic artist Reinhard Kleist says working with Syrian refugee children in northern Iraq as part of an ambitious multimedia project was the most emotional work he has ever done. "Unlike my work in Berlin, here I can interact directly with my subjects and see how they react to my drawings," the 43-year-old said after conducting a recent masterclass for children in Kawergosk refugee camp.

He was there to take part in a project by the Franco-German television channel, ARTE, to produce documentary programmes, interactive games, texts, photos and artwork from four refugee camps around the world.

Berlin-based Kleist is the author of several graphic novels and comic strips []. He devised the art workshop for children aged 8-14 years as a way of giving something back to the refugee community in return for the chance to be with them and witness their daily lives.

"When I was coming here, I wanted to bring something with me to give to the refugees, to feel better myself. I thought that if I brought colouring pencils and paints, I would give the children something useful and, at the same time, learn about their feelings and their lives here. It could also help them forget the war and the things they saw in Syria," he said.

One of the children, 13-year-old Lilav, drew a street scene from her neighbourhood in Damascus. "The thing I miss most is school and my friends in Syria," she said. Zadine, also 13, drew a petrol station near his home in Hassakeh, north-eastern Syria. "I miss my country very much," he said. "When I grow up, I would like to be an engineer."

Simon Ravelli, who manages Kawergosk camp for UNHCR implementing partner, ACTED, welcomed the initiative. "It gives a voice to the refugees living in a difficult context far from their homes. It is also a way for the children to get access through the workshop to different experiences, get new artistic skills and express themselves."

More than 1.1 million Syrian children are now refugees. A major new report released recently by UNHCR documents how Syrian refugee children are suffering from profound psychological distress, loneliness and trauma as a result of their experiences. The report, "The Future of Syria Refugee Children in Crisis," covers refugees in Lebanon and Jordan. It details the fracturing of families, with more than 70,000 Syrian refugee families living without fathers, and over 3,700 refugee children unaccompanied or separated from both parents.

Kawergosk camp provides shelter to more than 13,000 Syrian refugees. It was set up last August, along with five other camps, in the wake of a large influx from Syria into the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

By William Spindler in Erbil, Iraq

Read the Future Of Syria report




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Crisis in Iraq: Displacement

UNHCR and its partners estimate that out of a total population of 26 million, some 1.9 million Iraqis are currently displaced internally and more than 2 million others have fled to nearby countries. While many people were displaced before 2003, increasing numbers of Iraqis are now fleeing escalating sectarian, ethnic and general violence. Since January 2006, UNHCR estimates that more than 800,000 Iraqis have been uprooted and that 40,000 to 50,000 continue to flee their homes every month. UNHCR anticipates there will be approximately 2.3 million internally displaced people within Iraq by the end of 2007. The refugee agency and its partners have provided emergency assistance, shelter and legal aid to displaced Iraqis where security has allowed.

In January 2007, UNHCR launched an initial appeal for US$60 million to fund its Iraq programme. Despite security issues for humanitarian workers inside the country, UNHCR and partners hope to continue helping up to 250,000 of the most vulnerable internally displaced Iraqis and their host communities

Posted on 12 June 2007

Crisis in Iraq: Displacement

UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador Angelina Jolie meets Iraqi refugees in Syria

UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador Angelina Jolie returned to the Syrian capital Damascus on 2 October, 2009 to meet Iraqi refugees two years after her last visit. The award-winning American actress, accompanied by her partner Brad Pitt, took the opportunity to urge the international community not to forget the hundreds of thousands of Iraqi refugees who remain in exile despite a relative improvement in the security situation in their homeland. Jolie said most Iraqi refugees cannot return to Iraq in view of the severe trauma they experienced there, the uncertainty linked to the coming Iraqi elections, the security issues and the lack of basic services. They will need continued support from the international community, she said. The Goodwill Ambassador visited the homes of two vulnerable Iraqi families in the Jaramana district of southern Damascus. She was particularly moved during a meeting with a woman from a religious minority who told Jolie how she was physically abused and her son tortured after being abducted earlier this year in Iraq and held for days. They decided to flee to Syria, which has been a generous host to refugees.

UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador Angelina Jolie meets Iraqi refugees in Syria

Angelina Jolie returns to Iraq, urges support for the displaced

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During her day-long visit to Baghdad, UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador Angelina Jolie visited a makeshift settlement for internally displaced people in north-west Baghdad where she met families displaced from the district of Abu Ghraib, located to the west of Baghdad, and from the western suburbs of the capital.

Despite the difficulties in Iraq, Jolie said this was a moment of opportunity for Iraqis to rebuild their lives. "This is a moment where things seem to be improving on the ground, but Iraqis need a lot of support and help to rebuild their lives."

UNHCR estimates that 1.6 million Iraqis were internally displaced by a wave of sectarian warfare that erupted in February 2006 after the bombing of a mosque in the ancient city of Samarra. Almost 300,000 people have returned to their homes amid a general improvement in the security situation since mid-2008.

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