140,000 displaced from Iraq's Anbar province

Briefing Notes, 24 January 2014

This is a summary of what was said by UNHCR spokesperson Adrian Edwards to whom quoted text may be attributed at the press briefing, on 24 January 2014, at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

During the last week, more than 65,000 people have fled the conflict in the cities of Fallujah and Ramadi in central Iraq's Anbar province.

Since fighting broke out at the end of last year, more than 140,000 people have been made homeless by fighting according to Iraq's Ministry of Displacement and Migration. This is the largest displacement Iraq has witnessed since the sectarian violence of 2006-2008. This number is on top of the 1.13 million people already internally displaced in Iraq and who are mostly residing in Baghdad, Diyala and Ninewa provinces.

According to reports from people in Anbar, including UNHCR staff, many civilians are unable to leave conflict-affected areas where food and fuel are now in short supply.

Most of the recently displaced remain outside Fallujah city, accommodated by relatives or staying in schools, mosques and hospitals where resources are running low. Host families are having difficulties sustaining the burden of caring for the displaced. UNHCR and its humanitarian partners, including WFP, UNICEF, IOM, WHO, UNFPA and other agencies have managed to distribute tarpaulins, blankets, sleeping mats, food, and hygiene supplies. Yesterday (Thursday) saw UNHCR delivering 2,400 core relief kits. The Ministry of Displacement and Migration and the Iraqi parliament have also sent aid.

Many of the displaced, nonetheless, are still in desperate need of food, medical care and other aid. As the insecurity has spread, many families who fled several weeks ago have been displaced again.

The UN in Iraq has asked the government to facilitate the opening of a humanitarian corridor to reach displaced and stranded families in Anbar province. In recent weeks several bridges leading into the conflict area and communities hosting displaced people have been destroyed, making access difficult. Currently it is impossible to reach the area from Baghdad and relief agencies are using roads coming from northern Iraq.

Meanwhile, other areas of Iraq including Baghdad, Erbil, Kerbala, Salah-al-Din and Ninewa have witnessed the arrival of thousands of displaced persons. People are reportedly without money for food and lack suitable clothing for the rainy conditions. Children are not in school and sanitary conditions, particularly for women, are inadequate.

Establishing camps for the newly displaced is not our preferred option and may prolong displacement. But if the government of Iraq opts to establish sites, UNHCR is ready to provide tents and core relief items as well as provide support to camp management.

In northern Iraq, at the request of the Erbil government, UNHCR has refurbished the Baharka temporary site to host people arriving from Anbar province. Tents, electricity and sanitation facilities have been installed and the facility is ready to accommodate up to 300 families should the government decide to open the site. In Suleymaniya, some sections of Arbat camp, originally built for Syrian refugees, have been made available to accommodate Iraqi IDPs. There are some 300 displaced families in Suleymaniya.

Planning is currently under way to field additional mobile teams to strengthen capacity in Anbar and teams could also be dispatched to other provinces hosting IDPs.

For more information on this topic, please contact:

  • In Amman: Peter Kessler on mobile +962 79 631 7901
  • In Baghdad: Natalia Prokopchuk on mobile +964 780 921 7341
  • In Geneva: Adrian Edwards on mobile +41 79 557 9120
  • In Geneva: Dan McNorton on mobile +41 79 217 3011
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