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2015 UNHCR country operations profile - Yemen

| Overview |

Working environment

UNHCR 2015 Yemen country operations map

  • Since 2011, Yemen's transitional Government has been challenged by political instability and insecurity that have further weakened the country's social and economic situation. Internal conflicts - including tribal clashes, attacks and separatist movements - continue to create new displacement.

  • Yemen is a transit country of mixed migration flows, including asylum-seekers and migrants. The country hosts approximately 246,000 registered refugees, 95 per cent of whom are Somalis. The majority of asylum-seekers are from Ethiopia, representing more than three quarters of new arrivals in the first half of 2014.

  • Most Syrians in Yemen remain unregistered, with only some 2,000 having approached UNHCR by mid-2014. As of August 2014, Yemen was granting temporary protection to Syrians, allowing them to access services available to other refugees. More are expected to register.

  • While the number of people internally displaced in Yemen fell by 20 per cent in 2013, mainly due to mass returns to Abyan Governorate in southern Yemen, the numbers increased significantly again in 2014 as a result of ongoing conflicts in the north. As of July 2014, more than 334,000 people were registered as internally displaced.

  • Despite the challenges, Yemen's hospitality towards refugees is remarkable and the country is a signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol. Among other contributions, Yemen continues to provide land and security for Kharaz refugee camp, as well as access for refugees to the public health system and education in urban areas.

People of concern

The main groups of concern to UNHCR in Yemen are refugees and asylum-seekers from Ethiopia, Somalia and the Syrian Arab Republic (Syria), as well as IDPs. Somalis, who have fled the civil war which started in 1992, are granted prima facie status by the Government of Yemen. Ethiopians accounted for 52 per cent of registered asylum-seekers by mid-2014. The majority of Ethiopians continue to use Yemen as a transit route to other countries in the region and remain unregistered. Syrians started to arrive in Yemen in 2012 and, since August 2014, the Government has granted them temporary protection. IDPs are mostly located in the northern governorates, where clashes continue.

UNHCR 2015 planning figures for Yemen
Type of population Origin January 2015 December 2015
Total in country Of whom assisted
by UNHCR
Total in country Of whom assisted
by UNHCR
Total 658,160 603,160 675,400 620,400
Refugees Ethiopia 6,300 6,300 6,800 6,800
Iraq 3,300 3,300 3,100 3,100
Somalia 236,000 236,000 238,000 238,000
Various 2,000 2,000 2,200 2,200
People in refugee-like situations Syrian Arab Rep. 12,000 12,000 15,000 15,000
Asylum-seekers Eritrea 600 600 700 700
Ethiopia 7,500 7,500 7,000 7,000
Various 460 460 600 600
Internally displaced Yemen 365,000 310,000 365,000 310,000
Returnee arrivals during year (ex-IDPs) Yemen 25,000 25,000 37,000 37,000

| Response |

Needs and strategies

UNHCR's core strategy in 2015 aims to protect refugees and asylum-seekers, in particular by strengthening refugee status determination (RSD) activities and legal counselling. Detention monitoring and advocacy will be prioritized. The Office will also capitalize on the positive protection space, undertaking joint registration and training activities, as well as promotion of refugee law with the Government.

The Office will continue to seek durable solutions for refugees. Solutions will include resettlement for individuals who face no alternative, and the voluntary repatriation of Somali refugees, on an individual basis and within the regional framework. Social and economic integration will be pursued through the mainstreaming of health and education activities, as well as the promotion of self-reliance and livelihood opportunities.

Technical support will be extended to the Government for its regional coordination and the follow-up and implementation of the Sana'a Declaration, which was adopted in November 2013. The declaration aims to address challenges related to regional mixed migration and refugee flows.

In promoting durable solutions for IDPs, UNHCR, in the context of the UN Country Team, will support Yemen in assuming its responsibility for implementing the national IDP policy. Advocacy and training remain important needs and will be supported by strengthening the community-based protection-monitoring networks. This will enable the internally displaced to better understand their rights and how to obtain available support.

| Implementation |

Coordination

UNHCR will continue to foster relationships with its government counterparts, including the Ministry of Human Rights, the Bureau of Refugees' Affairs, the Ministry of Technical Education and Vocational Training, and the Ministry of Public Health and Population. Project partnership agreements are concluded with key ministries to define the scope of cooperation. Partnerships with NGOs will continue in 2015 and coordination on specific activities with ICRC, IOM, UNDP, UNICEF, WFP, UNOPS and UNV will be maintained. UNHCR will continue as the cluster lead for: protection; camp coordination and camp management; shelter; and non-food items.

2015 UNHCR partners in Yemen
Implementing partners
Government agencies: Ministry of Education, Ministry of Human Rights, the Executive Unit for IDPs
NGOs: Adventist Development and Relief Agency, Al-Amal Charitable Community for Social Welfare, Al-Bena, Association for Developing Persons with Special Needs, CARE, Charitable Society for Social Welfare, Danish Refugee Council, Interaction in Development Foundation, International Medical Corps, International Relief and Development, INTERSOS, Islamic Relief, Norwegian Refugee Council, Society for Humanitarian Solidarity, Solidarity Association for Development (Al Tadamon)
Others: IOM, Yemen Red Crescent Society, Sana'a University
Operational partners
Government agencies: Bureau for Refugees Affairs, Immigration and Passport Authority, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Higher Education, Ministry of the Interior, Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, Ministry of Public Health and Population, Ministry of Technical Education and Vocational Training, National Committee for Refugee Affairs
Others: FAO, ILO, OCHA, Office of the UN Special Envoy for Yemen, OHCHR, UNDP, UNFPA, UNICEF, WFP, WHO

| Financial information |

In 2015, the financial requirements are set at USD 59.5 million for the operation. This represents an increase of USD 3 million when compared with the revised 2014 budget, and is comparable to the level of the 2011 requirements. In case of funding shortfalls, self-reliance and livelihoods activities will be one of the areas which will have to be restricted. This will only widen the gap in meeting identified needs, despite self-reliance being recognized as a top priority during the 2013 age, gender and diversity mainstreaming assessment. The scale-up of voluntary repatriation would also limit UNHCR's ability to respond to emerging needs.

Source: UNHCR Global Appeal 2015 Update


UNHCR contact information

The UNHCR Representation in Yemen
Style of Address UNHCR Representative in Yemen
Street Address Street No. 38, Off Algerian Street, Building No. 2, Sana'a, Yemen
Mailing Address P.O. Box 12093, Sana'a, Yemen
Telephone 967 1 469 771
Facsimile 967 1 469 770
Email yemsa@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT + 3
Working Hours
Monday:8:00 - 16:00
Tuesday:8:00 - 16:00
Wednesday:8:00 - 16:00
Thursday:8:00 - 14:30
Friday:
Saturday:
Sunday:8:00 - 16:00
Public Holidays 01 January 2014, New Year's Day
01 May 2014, Labor Day
22 May 2014, Reunification Day
28 July 2014, Eid Al-Fitr
29 July 2014, Eid Al Fitr
05 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
06 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
07 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
25 October 2014, Islamic New Year
25 December 2014, Christmas Day
Kharaz
Style of Address The UNHCR Chief of Mission in Kharaz
Street Address Kharaz Camp, C/O of UNHCR SO, Aden, Yemen
Mailing Address P.O.BOX 6090, Kharaz, Aden, Yemen
Telephone 967 2 820844
Facsimile 967 2 820844
Email yemad@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT + 3
Working Hours
Monday:08:00 - 16:00
Tuesday:08:00 - 16:00
Wednesday:08:00 - 14:30
Thursday:
Friday:
Saturday:08:00 - 16:00
Sunday:08:00 - 16:00
Public Holidays 01 January 2014, New Year's Day
01 May 2014, Labor Day
22 May 2014, Reunification Day
28 July 2014, Eid Al-Fitr
29 July 2014, Eid Al Fitr
05 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
06 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
07 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
25 October 2014, Islamic New Year
25 December 2014, Christmas Day
The UNHCR Field Office at Mayfa'a
Style of Address The UNHCR Chief of Mission in Mayfa'a
Street Address Mayfa'a Camp, C/O UNHCR SO, Aden, Yemen
Mailing Address P.O.BOX 6090, Mayfa'a, Aden, Yemen
Telephone 967 5 280267
Email yemad@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT + 3
Working Hours
Monday:08:00 - 16.00
Tuesday:08:00 - 16.00
Wednesday:08:00 - 14:30
Thursday:
Friday:
Saturday:08:00 - 16.00
Sunday:08:00 - 16.00
Public Holidays 01 January 2014, New Year's Day
01 May 2014, Labor Day
22 May 2014, Reunification Day
28 July 2014, Eid Al-Fitr
29 July 2014, Eid Al Fitr
05 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
06 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
07 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
25 October 2014, Islamic New Year
25 December 2014, Christmas Day
The UNHCR Field Office in Amran
Style of Address The UNHCR Head of Field Office in Amran
Street Address Hajjah Street, Next to Amran Public Electicity Office, Amran, Yemen
Mailing Address P.O. Box 12093, Amran, Yemen
Telephone 967 7 603 204
Facsimile 967 7 603 204
Email yemsa@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT + 3
Working Hours
Monday:08 .00 - 16 .00
Tuesday:08 .00 - 16 .00
Wednesday:08 .00 - 14 .30
Thursday:
Friday:
Saturday:08 .00 - 16 .00
Sunday:08 .00 - 16 .00
Public Holidays 01 January 2014, New Year's Day
01 May 2014, Labor Day
22 May 2014, Reunification Day
28 July 2014, Eid Al-Fitr
29 July 2014, Eid Al Fitr
05 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
06 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
07 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
25 October 2014, Islamic New Year
25 December 2014, Christmas Day
The UNHCR Field Office in Haradh
Style of Address The UNHCR Head of Field Office in Haradh
Street Address Haradh District, Tabza Village, Hajjah Government, Haradh, Yemen
Mailing Address P.O. Box: 12093, Sana'a, Yemen
Telephone 967 7 246451
Email yemsa@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT + 3
Working Hours
Monday:08:00 - 16:00
Tuesday:08:00 - 16:00
Wednesday:08:00 - 14:30
Thursday:
Friday:
Saturday:08:00 - 16:00
Sunday:08:00 - 16:00
Public Holidays 01 January 2014, New Year's Day
01 May 2014, Labor Day
22 May 2014, Reunification Day
28 July 2014, Eid Al-Fitr
29 July 2014, Eid Al Fitr
05 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
06 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
07 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
25 October 2014, Islamic New Year
25 December 2014, Christmas Day
The UNHCR Sub-Office at Aden
Style of Address The UNHCR Head of Sub-Office at Aden
Street Address HOSHI MANA Street, Beside German Consulate,, Shopping area-Building no. 27 & 28, Khormakser, Aden, Yemen
Mailing Address P.O. Box 6090, Aden, Yemen
Telephone 967 2 23 14 41
Facsimile 967 2 23 44 06
Email yemad@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT + 3
Working Hours
Monday:8:00 - 16:00
Tuesday:8:00 - 16:00
Wednesday:8:00 - 14:30
Thursday:
Friday:
Saturday:8:00 - 16:00
Sunday:8:00 - 16:00
Public Holidays 01 January 2014, New Year's Day
01 May 2014, Labor Day
22 May 2014, Reunification Day
28 July 2014, Eid Al-Fitr
29 July 2014, Eid Al Fitr
05 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
06 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
07 October 2014, Eid Al-Adha
25 October 2014, Islamic New Year
25 December 2014, Christmas Day
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Statistical Snapshot*
* As at January 2014
  1. Country or territory of asylum or residence. In the absence of Government estimates, UNHCR has estimated the refugee population in most industrialized countries based on 10 years of asylum-seekers recognition.
  2. Persons recognized as refugees under the 1951 UN Convention/1967 Protocol, the 1969 OAU Convention, in accordance with the UNHCR Statute, persons granted a complementary form of protection and those granted temporary protection. It also includes persons in a refugee-like situation whose status has not yet been verified.
  3. Persons whose application for asylum or refugee status is pending at any stage in the procedure.
  4. Refugees who have returned to their place of origin during the first six months of 2013. Source: Country of origin and asylum.
  5. Persons who are displaced within their country and to whom UNHCR extends protection and/or assistance. It also includes persons who are in an IDP-like situation.
  6. IDPs protected/assisted by UNHCR who have returned to their place of origin during the first six months of 2013.
  7. Refers to persons under UNHCR's statelessness mandate.
  8. Persons of concern to UNHCR not included in the previous columns but to whom UNHCR extends protection and/or assistance.
  9. The category of people in a refugee-like situation is descriptive in nature and includes groups of people who are outside their country of origin and who face protection risks similar to those of refugees, but for whom refugee status has, for practical or other reasons, not been ascertained.
The data are generally provided by Governments, based on their own definitions and methods of data collection.
A dash (-) indicates that the value is zero, not available or not applicable.

Source: UNHCR/Governments.
Compiled by: UNHCR, FICSS.
Residing in Yemen [1]
Refugees [2] 241,288
Asylum Seekers [3] 8,197
Returned Refugees [4] 4
Internally Displaced Persons (IDPS) [5] 306,614
Returned IDPs [6] 93,055
Stateless Persons [7] 0
Various [8] 0
Total Population of Concern 649,158
Originating from Yemen [1]
Refugees [2] 2,428
Asylum Seekers [3] 1,881
Returned Refugees [4] 4
Internally Displaced Persons (IDPS) [5] 306,614
Returned IDPs [6] 93,055
Various [8] 6
Total Population of Concern 403,988
Government Contributions to UNHCR
Contributions since 2000
YearUSD
2014 0
2013 0
2012 0
2011 0
2010 0
2009 0
2008 0
2007 2,158
2006 0
2005 0
2004 0
2003 0
2002 0
2001 2,160
2000 2,160

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New Arrivals in Yemen

During one six-day period at the end of March, more than 1,100 Somalis and Ethiopians arrived on the shores of Yemen after crossing the Gulf of Aden on smuggler's boats from Bosaso, Somalia. At least 28 people died during these recent voyages – from asphyxiation, beating or drowning – and many were badly injured by the smugglers. Others suffered skin problems as a result of prolonged contact with sea water, human waste, diesel oil and other chemicals.

During a recent visit to Yemen, UNHCR Assistant High Commissioner for Protection Erika Feller pledged to further raise the profile of the situation, to appeal for additional funding and international action to help Yemen, and to develop projects that will improve the living conditions and self sufficiency of the refugees in Yemen.

Since January 2006, Yemen has received nearly 30,000 people from Somalia, Ethiopia and other places, while more than 500 people have died during the sea crossing and at least 300 remain missing. UNHCR provides assistance, care and housing to more than 100,000 refugees already in Yemen.

New Arrivals in Yemen

The Gulf of Aden: Sharp Rise in Crossings and Deaths

The number of people arriving on the coast of Yemen after being smuggled across the treacherous Gulf of Aden from the Horn of Africa has more than doubled this year. So far this year, more than 18,000 people have arrived in Yemen across the Gulf of Aden, and nearly 400 have died attempting the journey.

This surge in arrivals is largely due to the continuing conflict in Somalia and the use of new smuggling routes from Somalia to Yemen and across the Red Sea from Djibouti. Many of the new arrivals also tell of crop losses due to drought, which forced them to leave home. This photo set focuses on those people leaving from Djibouti.

UNHCR has been calling for increased action to save lives in the Gulf of Aden and other waters. We have stepped up our work in Yemen under a US$17 million operation that includes extra staff, provision of additional shelter and assistance, and protection for refugees and internally displaced people.

Posted on 20 May 2008

The Gulf of Aden: Sharp Rise in Crossings and Deaths

Gulf of Aden People-Smuggling: International Help Needed

An alarming number of people are dying trying to reach Yemen aboard smugglers' boats crossing the Gulf of Aden from Somalia. Over a three-week period in late 2005, at least 150 people perished while making the journey. These deaths are frequently the result of overcrowded boats capsizing or breaking down and going adrift without food or water. Those who survive the voyage to Yemen often give brutal accounts of smugglers beating passengers or forcing them overboard while still far off shore – in some instances with their hands and feet bound.

In response, UNHCR has issued an urgent appeal for action to stem the flow of desperate Ethiopian and Somali refugees and migrants falling prey to ruthless smugglers in a bid to reach Yemen and beyond. The refugee agency has also been working with the authorities in Puntland, in north-eastern Somalia, on ways to inform people about the dangers of using smugglers to cross the Gulf of Aden. This includes production of videos and radio programmes to raise awareness among Somalis and Ethiopians of the risks involved in such crossings.

Gulf of Aden People-Smuggling: International Help Needed

Crossing the Gulf of Aden

Every year thousands of people in the Horn of Africa - mainly Somalis and Ethiopians - leave their homes out of fear or pure despair, in search of safety or a better life. They make their way over dangerous Somali roads to Bossaso in the northern semi-autonomous region of Puntland.

In this lawless area, smuggler networks have free reign and innocent and desperate civilians pay up to US$150 to make the perilous trip across the Gulf of Aden.

Some stay weeks on end in safe houses or temporary homes in Bossaso before they can depart. A sudden call and a departure in the middle of the night, crammed in small unstable boats. At sea, anything can happen to them - they are at the whim of smugglers. Some people get beaten, stabbed, killed and thrown overboard. Others drown before arriving on the beaches of Yemen, which have become the burial ground for hundreds who many of those who died en route.

Crossing the Gulf of Aden

2011 Yemen: Risking All for a Better Future

Plagued by violence, drought and poverty, thousands of people in the Horn of Africa leave their homes out of desperation every year. Seeking safety or a better life, these civilians - mainly Somalis and Ethiopians - make the dangerous journey through Somalia to the northern port of Bossaso.

Once there, they pay up to US$150 to make the perilous trip across the Gulf of Aden on smugglers' boats. They often wait for weeks in Bossaso's safe houses or temporary homes until a sudden call prompts their departure under the veil of night, crammed into small rickety boats.

Out at sea, they are at the whim of smugglers. Some passengers get beaten, stabbed, killed and thrown overboard. Others drown before reaching the beaches of Yemen, which have become the burial ground for hundreds of innocent people who die en route.

The Yemen-based Society for Humanitarian Solidarity (SHS) has been helping these people since 1995. On September 13, 2011 UNHCR announced that the NGO had won this year's Nansen Refugee Award for its tireless efforts to assist people arriving from the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea.

2011 Yemen: Risking All for a Better Future

Yemeni humanitarian aid group wins 2011 Nansen Refugee Award

The founder and staff of the Society for Humanitarian Solidarity (SHS), a humanitarian organization in Yemen, has won the 2011 Nansen Refugee Award for their work in aiding and rescuing refugees and migrants who make the dangerous sea journey across the Gulf of Aden from the Horn of Africa. View a slideshow of the group's life-saving work, patrolling the beaches of southern Yemen for new arrivals and providing food, shelter and medical care to those who survive the dangerous journey.

Yemeni humanitarian aid group wins 2011 Nansen Refugee Award

Shelter for the Displaced in Yemen

The port city of Aden in southern Yemen has long been a destination for refugees, asylum-seekers and economic migrants after making the dangerous sea crossing from the Horn of Africa. Since May 2011, Aden also has been providing shelter to tens of thousands of Yemenis fleeing fighting between government forces and armed groups in neighbouring Abyan governorate.

Most of the 157,000 internally displaced people (IDPs) from Abyan have found shelter with friends and relatives, but some 20,000 have been staying in dozens of public schools and eight vacant public buildings. Conditions are crowded with several families living together in a single classroom.

Many IDPs expected their displacement would not be for long. They wish to return home, but cannot do so due to the fighting. Moreover, some are fearful of reprisals if they return to areas where many homes were destroyed or severely damaged in bombings.

UNHCR has provided emergency assistance, including blankets, plastic sheeting and wood stoves, to almost 70,000 IDPs from Abyan. Earlier this year, UNHCR rehabilitated two buildings, providing shelter for 2,000 people and allowing 3,000 children, IDPs and locals, to resume schooling in proper classrooms. UNHCR is advocating with the authorities for the conversion of additional public buildings into transitional shelters for the thousands of IDPs still living in schools.

Photographer Pepe Rubio Larrauri travelled to Aden in March 2012 to document the day-to-day lives of the displaced.

Shelter for the Displaced in Yemen

The 2011 Nansen Refugee Award

At this year's Nansen Refugee Award presentation ceremony in Geneva, the UN refugee agency paid tribute to award-winning American actress Angelina Jolie and Yemeni humanitarian aid group, the Society for Humanitarian Solidarity, for their outstanding work for refugees over many years.

Jolie was recognized for completing 10 years as UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador. The American actress joined UN High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres to present the Nansen Award to Nasser Salim Ali Al-Hamairy for his NGO's live-saving work in helping tens of thousands of desperate boat people arriving on the coast of Yemen from the Horn of Africa.

The Nansen Refugee Award was created in 1954 in honour of Fridtjof Nansen, the legendary Norwegian explorer, scientist, diplomat and politician who in the 1920s became the first international High Commissioner for Refugees. It is given annually to an individual or organization for outstanding work on behalf of refugees and consists of a commemorative medal and a US$100,000 prize donated by the governments of Switzerland and Norway.

The 2011 Nansen Refugee Award

Yemeni Province Starts Rebuilding as 100,000 Displaced Return

Life is slowly returning to normal in urban and rural areas of the southern Yemeni province of Abyan, where fighting between government forces and rebels caused major population displacements in 2011 and 2012.

But since last July, as hostilities subsided and security began to improve, more than 100,000 internally displaced people (IDP) have returned to their homes in the province, or governorate. Most spent more than a year in temporary shelters in neighbouring provinces such as Aden and Lahj.

Today, laughing children once more play without fear in the streets of towns like the Abyan capital, Zinjibar, and shops are reopening. But the damage caused by the conflict is visible in many areas and the IDPs have returned to find a lack of basic services and livelihood opportunities as well as lingering insecurity in some areas.

There is frustration about the devastation, which has also affected electricity and water supplies, but most returnees are hopeful about the future and believe reconstruction will soon follow. UNHCR has been providing life-saving assistance since the IDP crisis first began in 2011, and is now helping with the returns.

Amira Al Sharif, a Yemeni photojournalist, visited Abyan recently to document life for the returnees.

Yemeni Province Starts Rebuilding as 100,000 Displaced Return

East Africans continue to flood into the Arabian Peninsula

Every month, thousands of refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants from Somalia and Ethiopia cross the Gulf of Aden or the Red Sea to reach Yemen, fleeing drought, poverty, conflict or persecution. And although this year's numbers are, so far, lower than in 2012 - about 62,200 in the first 10 months compared to 88,533 for the same period last year - the Gulf of Aden remains one of the world's most travelled sea routes for irregular migration (asylum-seekers and migrants). UNHCR and its local partners monitor the coast to provide assistance to the new arrivals and transport them to reception centres. Those who make it to Yemen face many challenges and risks. The government regards Somalis as prima facie refugees and automatically grants them asylum, but other nationals such as the growing number of Ethiopians can face detention. Some of the Somalis make their own way to cities like Aden, but about 50 a day arrive at Kharaz Refugee Camp, which is located in the desert in southern Yemen. Photographer Jacob Zocherman recently visited the Yemen coast where arrivals land, and the camp where many end up.

East Africans continue to flood into the Arabian Peninsula

"Do You See What I See?" Exploring the words and photographs of refugee children

For more than a year, a collection of startling photographs taken by refugee children in Namibia and Yemen has been travelling the world, giving a glimpse into the lives and thoughts of people whose lives have been thrown into turmoil at such a young age.

Professional photographer Brendan Bannon conducted the "Do You See What I See" project for the UN refugee agency in Yemen's Kharaz Refugee Camp and Namibia's Osire Refugee Camp.

He ran a series of intensive two-week photo workshops for a dozen children in each camp. Bannon guided them through a series of exercises that focused on the self, the community, the family and dreams. Here are some of the amazing results.

"What emerges in these pictures is a commentary on humanity - proposing what to them is love, what is suffering, what is funny, what can be discovered about self, family, history and community: What makes us alike and what makes us different," Bannon wrote.

A travelling photo exhibition was put together and has been seen by thousands of people around the world. It is now showing at the United Nations in New York, but the photo exhibition has never been shown on UNHCR's website before.

"Do You See What I See?" Exploring the words and photographs of refugee children

Yemeni NGO wins Nansen AwardPlay video

Yemeni NGO wins Nansen Award

The Society for Humanitarian Solidarity wins the 2011 Nansen Refugee Award for helping tens of thousands of refugees and migrants who make the treacherous journey to Yemen on smugglers' boats.
Yemen: Waiting for peacePlay video

Yemen: Waiting for peace

The Yemeni government has declared the war in the north is over. But most of the roughly 280,000 people uprooted by the violence are reluctant to return home.
Yemen: Further DisplacementPlay video

Yemen: Further Displacement

In Yemen the fighting continues in the north. UNHCR reports that the numbers of families fleeing is mounting and camps for the displaced are becoming crowded.
Conflict in YemenPlay video

Conflict in Yemen

The situation in northern Yemen remains tense and volatile. The UN refugee agency is providing assistance to the thousands who have fled their homes to escape recent fighting between government forces and rebel fighters, but continued insecurity makes access difficult.
Yemen: Risking RefugePlay video

Yemen: Risking Refuge

Increasingly large numbers of Somali refugees and other desperate people are trying to make their way across the Gulf of Aden to the shores of Yemen to find refuge from war and poverty. This desperate journey has cost hundreds their lives as they seek a better life. UNHCR assists those who survive and tries to discourage others from making the perilous journey. Note that this video contains graphic images.
Testimonial: Somali SurvivorPlay video

Testimonial: Somali Survivor

Testimonial of a Somali survivor after reaching Yemen