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2014 UNHCR country operations profile - Colombia

| Overview |

Working environment

  • The Government of Colombia continues to pursue a peace dialogue with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), a process which aims at finding a negotiated solution to end internal conflict. However, despite positive reactions to the dialogue, in some parts of the country, clashes between the army and FARC have intensified, causing additional forced displacement. There are also indications that the peace process itself may lead to increased risks for some sectors of the population, for example local leaders and candidates for local elections in affected communities.

  • Forced internal displacement in Colombia continues to be a matter of serious concern. According to official figures of March 2013, over 4.7 million people were internally displaced. This figure takes into account new regulations under the Law on Victims and Land Restitution (Victims Law) of 2011. However, it does not yet take into account the Constitutional Court's decision of June 2013 to review all previous decisions that did not include cases of displacement caused by violence perpetrated by some armed groups following demobilization. As displacement caused by these groups was not officially recognized previously, this revision will result in an increase in figures reported and UNHCR anticipates that at the end of 2013 the number will reach over 5.2 million people.

  • According to reports by UNHCR field offices, between January and June 2013 there were 61 large group (50 individuals or more) displacements in the country. Up until April, only six of these group displacements were registered by the Government's Victims' Unit, affecting 3,685 families.

  • Despite the Government's efforts to improve its response to forced displacement and implement the Victims Law, widespread insecurity and violence including the forced recruitment of children and youth, sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV), threats, disappearances and murders continue to occur in many regions. The growth of displacement in urban areas and continued conflict in remote rural areas that are difficult to access for UNHCR and its partners, highlight the need for the continuation of prevention and protection programmes at national and local levels.

  • UNHCR is working with the authorities and communities to promote sustainable solutions, especially local integration, as more than half the number of registered internally displaced people (IDPs) reside in cities and are unable or unwilling to return to their communities of origin. The UNHCR-UNDP Transitional Solutions Initiative (TSI) project is targeting 17 communities, prioritizing local integration, relocation and returnee processes.

  • In 2014, the Government will continue to assist IDP populations with housing subsidies, health services, education, and humanitarian aid, and further strengthen the legal and administrative framework to implement the Law on Victims and Land Restitution.

People of concern

The majority of people of concern planned for in 2014 are IDPs. Colombia also hosts 230 refugees and 150 asylum-seekers. Most live in urban centres and originate from Cuba, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Nicaragua, Somalia and the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela. During the first half of 2013, 49 people applied to the Government for asylum, and a similar trend is expected in 2014.

Planning figures

UNHCR 2014 planning figures for Colombia
TYPE OF POPULATION ORIGIN Dec 2013 Dec 2014 Dec 2015
Total in country of whom assisted
by UNHCR
Total in country of whom assisted
by UNHCR
Total in country of whom assisted
by UNHCR
Total 5,200,480 400,290 5,740,530 425,340 5,840,590 410,400
Refugees Various 230 90 260 70 270 80
Asylum-seekers Various 150 100 120 120 120 120
Returnee arrivals during year (ex-refugees) Colombia 100 100 150 150 200 200
Internally displaced Colombia 5,200,000 400,000 5,740,000 425,000 5,840,000 410,000

| Response |

Needs and strategies

The Office's key strategic priorities in Colombia continue to be the prevention of displacement, the protection of displaced populations and the search for solutions. The main causes of displacement are linked to confrontations involving illegal armed groups and the armed forces, the presence of land mines, and threats to communities related to territorial control.

The Office's strategies will be implemented through cross-cutting projects covering land protection and restitution; community-based protection and engagement with populations, with an emphasis on Afro-Colombian and indigenous communities; registration; legal aid; and the protection of children and youth.

UNHCR will continue providing technical assistance to national and local authorities and promote self-reliance projects among communities. The Office will ensure that protection gaps for specific communities or groups with special needs remain a key area of attention.

UNHCR will pursue its strategy to prevent forced displacement by: ensuring protection-by-presence in remote areas affected by ongoing conflict; expanding humanitarian space through implementation of the community-based protection strategy and practical protection projects (PPPs); and strengthening early warning systems and conducting protection risks analysis.

To improve the protection of displaced populations, UNHCR will contribute to the strengthening of public policies, including on land restitution, and provide technical assistance to national and local authorities responsible for protection and provision of reparation for victims. The Office will also strengthen registration, legal aid and follow-up in large-group displacement situations and encourage the development of local contingency plans and emergency response. Risk analysis by national authorities will be supported and collective protection measures developed for communities at risk, including their leaders.

UNHCR's search for sustainable solutions will focus on: consolidating the TSI project in 17 prioritized communities, through the identification of lessons learned and best practices to aid in the development of public policy on solutions at the national level; and promoting the transition from forced displacement to people regaining their full rights as citizens.

With regard to refugees and asylum-seekers, UNHCR's overall goal will be to help the Government develop laws and policies which are consistent with international protection standards and promote access for people of concern to durable solutions based on their specific needs.

| Implementation |

Coordination

UNHCR will maintain a close working relationship with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Presidential Programme for Social Prosperity through the Special Administrative Unit for Victims Assistance, Reparation and Land Restitution, as well as with the National Protection Unit. The Office has also established partnerships with line ministries, in particular the Ministries of Agriculture and Interior, the Colombian Institute for Family Welfare, the Vice-President's Office, local administrations and community-based organizations. UNHCR continues to support the National Controller's Office in ensuring official accountability for the provision of effective assistance in addressing the needs of IDPs.

The protection cluster, which includes 21 organizations in Colombia, continues to be co-led by UNHCR and NRC. UNHCR is an active member of the UN Country Team and participates in inter-agency coordination. UNHCR and UNDP are working together on the TSI project, and alliances have been formed and will be strengthened with national, regional and local authorities as well as with NGOs and development actors that will be engaged in the TSI project.

2014 UNHCR partners in Colombia
Implementing partners
Government agencies: Agency for International Cooperation, Attorney- General's Office, Colombian Institute for Family Welfare, Colombian Institute for Rural Development, Constitutional Court, Controller's Office, Department for Social Prosperity, High Presidential Counsellor's Office, Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Interior, Ombudsman's Office, President's Office, Procurator-General's Office, Special Administrative Unit for Land Restitution, Special Administrative Unit for Victims' Assistance and Reparation, Vice-Regional Government and Mayors' offices
NGOs: Action Contre la Faim, Consultoría para los Derechos Humanos y el Desplazamiento, Corporación Infancia y Desarrollo, Corporación Opción Legal, Corporación para la Investigación y el Desarrollo de la Democracia, Corporación Retoños, Fundación Compartir, Organización Nacional Indígena de Colombia, Secretariado Nacional de la Pastoral Social, Servicio Jesuita para Refugiados
Others: Universidad de los Andes, Universidad Externado, Universidad Javeriana
Operational partners
NGOs: International Relief & Development, Médecins sans Frontières, Norwegian Refugee Council, Peace Brigades International, Plan International, Save the Children Fund
Others: FAO, ICRC, IOM, OAS Mission to Support the Peace Process in Colombia, OCHA, OHCHR, Oxfam, Pan-American Health Organization/WHO, UN Women, UNDP, UNDSS, UNFPA, UNICEF, UNODC, WFP

| Financial information |

Over the last several years, UNHCR's operation in Colombia has continued to receive support from the international community. However, this support has fluctuated, reflecting the global financial crisis and the multiplication of humanitarian crises elsewhere, which in turn have affected UNHCR's ability to optimize its activities in the country. During this time, additional funding was obtained from development sources for the Transitional Solutions Initiative (TSI), and in 2014, the operation will continue to seek development funding for this project. The financial requirements for the operation in Colombia in 2014 are set at USD 30.5 million.

Source: UNHCR Global Appeal 2014-2105


UNHCR contact information

UNHCR Representative in Colombia
Style of Address UNHCR Representative in Colombia
Street Address Calle 113 No 7-21 Oficina 601. Bogota, Colombia.
Mailing Address Calle 113 No 7-21 Oficina 601. Bogota, Colombia.
Telephone +571 6580600
Facsimile +571 6580600
Email colbo@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Calle 100F N° 109-22, Apartado, colombia
Mailing Address Calle 100F N° 109-22, Apartado, colombia
Telephone +574 8287719
Facsimile +574 8287723
Email colap@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Calle 20 Nro 24 - 68, Barrio las Corocoras, Arauca, Colombia
Mailing Address Calle 20 Nro 24 - 68, Barrio las Corocoras, Arauca, Colombia
Telephone +577 8857788
Facsimile +577 8856804
Email colar@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Cra. 25 No. 44-42 Barrio El Recreo, Barrancabermeja, Colombia
Mailing Address Cra. 25 No. 44-42 Barrio El Recreo, Barrancabermeja, Colombia
Telephone +577 6222186
Facsimile +577 6222092
Email colba@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Cra 54 No.68-196 piso 9. Barranquilla, Colombia
Mailing Address Cra 54 No.68-196 piso 9. Barranquilla, Colombia
Telephone +575 3681138
Facsimile +575 3600195
Email colbr@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Cra.3 No. 7-32 Oficina 1302 Edificio Pacific Trade Center, Buenaventura, Colombia
Mailing Address Cra.3 No. 7-32 Oficina 1302 Edificio Pacific Trade Center, Buenaventura, Colombia
Telephone +572 2423615
Facsimile +572 2422067
Email colbn@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Avenida 1a. Nro. 12-35 Centro. Cucuta, Colombia
Mailing Address Avenida 1a. Nro. 12-35 Centro. Cucuta, Colombia
Telephone +577 5725725
Facsimile +577 5725728
Email colcu@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Calle 12 No 20c-108, Barrio El Dorado, San Jose del Guaviare, Colombia
Mailing Address Calle 12 No 20c-108, Barrio El Dorado, San Jose del Guaviare, Colombia
Telephone +578 5840001
Facsimile +578 5840001
Email colsg@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Calle 7 No 39-215 Ofi 1301. Medellin, Colombia
Mailing Address Calle 7 No 39-215 Ofi 1301. Medellin, Colombia
Telephone +574 3522795
Facsimile +574 2666035
Email colme@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Calle 12 Carrera 11 (Esquina Barrio Obrero). Mocoa, Colombia
Mailing Address Calle 12 Carrera 11 (Esquina Barrio Obrero). Mocoa, Colombia
Telephone +578 4200001
Facsimile +578 4200002
Email colmo@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Cra 5 No. 10-38 Piso 11, Edificio Cámara De Comercio. Neiva, Colombia
Mailing Address Cra 5 No. 10-38 Piso 11, Edificio Cámara De Comercio. Neiva, Colombia
Telephone +579 8722934
Facsimile +579 8722934
Email colne@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Calle 20 No.40-73. Pasto, Colombia
Mailing Address Calle 20 No.40-73. Pasto, Colombia
Telephone +572 7313009
Facsimile +572 7313016
Email colps@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Barrio La isla (Frente a la escuela) Manzana 61 Lote 27, Soacha, Cundinamarca, colombia
Mailing Address Calle 113 No 7-21 Oficina 601, Bogota, Colombia
Telephone +517 6580600
Facsimile +517 6580602
Email colso@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
Head of Office
Style of Address Head of Office
Street Address Transv. 26 # 41-20 Barrio la Grama. Villavicencio Colombia
Mailing Address Transv. 26 # 41-20 Barrio la Grama. Villavicencio Colombia
Telephone +578 6645487
Facsimile +578 6645487
Email colvi@unhcr.org
Time Zone GMT - 5:00
Public Holidays 10 January
21 March
21 April
22 April
6 June
20 July
15 August
17 October
7 November
8 December
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Statistical Snapshot*
* As at January 2014
  1. Country or territory of asylum or residence. In the absence of Government estimates, UNHCR has estimated the refugee population in most industrialized countries based on 10 years of asylum-seekers recognition.
  2. Persons recognized as refugees under the 1951 UN Convention/1967 Protocol, the 1969 OAU Convention, in accordance with the UNHCR Statute, persons granted a complementary form of protection and those granted temporary protection. It also includes persons in a refugee-like situation whose status has not yet been verified.
  3. Persons whose application for asylum or refugee status is pending at any stage in the procedure.
  4. Refugees who have returned to their place of origin during the first six months of 2013. Source: Country of origin and asylum.
  5. Persons who are displaced within their country and to whom UNHCR extends protection and/or assistance. It also includes persons who are in an IDP-like situation.
  6. IDPs protected/assisted by UNHCR who have returned to their place of origin during the first six months of 2013.
  7. Refers to persons under UNHCR's statelessness mandate.
  8. Persons of concern to UNHCR not included in the previous columns but to whom UNHCR extends protection and/or assistance.
  9. The category of people in a refugee-like situation is descriptive in nature and includes groups of people who are outside their country of origin and who face protection risks similar to those of refugees, but for whom refugee status has, for practical or other reasons, not been ascertained.
The data are generally provided by Governments, based on their own definitions and methods of data collection.
A dash (-) indicates that the value is zero, not available or not applicable.

Source: UNHCR/Governments.
Compiled by: UNHCR, FICSS.
Residing in Colombia [1]
Refugees [2] 224
Asylum Seekers [3] 71
Returned Refugees [4] 17
Internally Displaced Persons (IDPS) [5] 5,368,138
Returned IDPs [6] 0
Stateless Persons [7] 12
Various [8] 0
Total Population of Concern 5,368,462
Originating from Colombia [1]
Refugees [2] 396,635
Asylum Seekers [3] 16,734
Returned Refugees [4] 17
Internally Displaced Persons (IDPS) [5] 5,368,138
Returned IDPs [6] 0
Various [8] 0
Total Population of Concern 5,781,524
Government Contributions to UNHCR
2013 Contributions Breakdown
Total contribution in USD: 172,162 [rank: 44]
Unrestricted contribution (USD): 10,000 [rank: 47]
Donor ranking per GDP: 56
Donor ranking per capita: 58
2013 Contributions chart
Contributions since 2000
YearUSD
2014 0
2013
More info 172,162
Total contribution in USD: 172,162 [rank: 44]
Unrestricted contribution (USD): 10,000 [rank: 47]
Donor ranking per GDP: 56
Donor ranking per capita: 58
2012
More info 1,000,000
Total contribution in USD: 1,000,000 [rank: 31]
Donor ranking per GDP: 41
Donor ranking per capita: 43
2011 10,000
2010 25,000
2009 0
2008 25,000
2007
More info 525,000
Total contribution in USD: 525,000 (rank: 31)
Unrestricted contribution (USD): 25,000 (rank: 42)
Donor ranking per GDP: 34
Donor ranking per capita: 39
2006 28,429
2005 25,000
2004 25,000
2003 22,523
2002 25,000
2001 25,000
2000 19,000

Colombia UNHCR Fundraising Reports Rss FeedUNHCR Fundraising Reports

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Colombia UNHCR Maps Rss FeedUNHCR Maps

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Colombia: Life in the Barrios

After more than forty years of internal armed conflict, Colombia has one of the largest populations of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the world. Well over two million people have been forced to flee their homes; many of them have left remote rural areas to take refuge in the relative safety of the cities.

Displaced families often end up living in slum areas on the outskirts of the big cities, where they lack even the most basic services. Just outside Bogota, tens of thousands of displaced people live in the shantytowns of Altos de Cazuca and Altos de Florida, with little access to health, education or decent housing. Security is a problem too, with irregular armed groups and gangs controlling the shantytowns, often targeting young people.

UNHCR is working with the authorities in ten locations across Colombia to ensure that the rights of internally displaced people are fully respected – including the rights to basic services, health and education, as well as security.

Colombia: Life in the Barrios

Indigenous people in Colombia

There are about a million indigenous people in Colombia. They belong to 80 different groups and make up one of the world's most diverse indigenous heritages. But the internal armed conflict is taking its toll on them.

Like many Colombians, indigenous people often have no choice but to flee their lands to escape violence. Forced displacement is especially tragic for them because they have extremely strong links to their ancestral lands. Often their economic, social and cultural survival depends on keeping these links alive.

According to Colombia's national indigenous association ONIC, 18 of the smaller groups are at risk of disappearing. UNHCR is working with them to support their struggle to stay on their territories or to rebuild their lives when they are forced to flee.

UNHCR also assists indigenous refugees in neighbouring countries like Panama, Ecuador, Venezuela and Brazil. UNHCR is developing a regional strategy to better address the specific needs of indigenous people during exile.

Indigenous people in Colombia

Panama's Hidden Refugees

Colombia's armed conflict has forced millions of people to flee their homes, including hundreds of thousands who have sought refuge in other countries in the region.

Along the border with Colombia, Panama's Darien region is a thick and inhospitable jungle accessible only by boat. Yet many Colombians have taken refuge here after fleeing the irregular armed groups who control large parts of jungle territory on the other side of the border.

Many of the families sheltering in the Darien are from Colombia's ethnic minorities – indigenous or Afro-Colombians – who have been particularly badly hit by the conflict and forcibly displaced in large numbers. In recent years, there has also been an increase in the numbers of Colombians arriving in the capital, Panama City.

There are an estimated 12,500 Colombians of concern to UNHCR in Panama, but many prefer not to make themselves known to authorities and remain in hiding. This "hidden population" is one of the biggest challenges facing UNHCR not only in Panama but also in Ecuador and Venezuela.

Panama's Hidden Refugees

Education for Displaced Colombians

UNHCR works with the government of Colombia to address the needs of children displaced by violence.

Two million people are listed on Colombia's National Register for Displaced People. About half of them are under the age of 18, and, according to the Ministry of Education, only half of these are enrolled in school.

Even before displacement, Colombian children attending school in high-risk areas face danger from land mines, attacks by armed groups and forced recruitment outside of schools. Once displaced, children often lose an entire academic year. In addition, the trauma of losing one's home and witnessing extreme violence often remain unaddressed, affecting the child's potential to learn. Increased poverty brought on by displacement usually means that children must work to help support the family, making school impossible.

UNHCR supports the government's response to the educational crisis of displaced children, which includes local interventions in high-risk areas, rebuilding damaged schools, providing school supplies and supporting local teachers' organizations. UNHCR consults with the Ministry of Education to ensure the needs of displaced children are known and planned for. It also focuses on the educational needs of ethnic minorities such as the Afro-Colombians and indigenous people.

UNHCR's ninemillion campaign aims to provide a healthy and safe learning environment for nine million refugee children by 2010.

Education for Displaced Colombians

Colombia: Assisting the Internally Displaced

Colombia is the worst humanitarian crisis in the western hemisphere. More than two million people have been internally displaced during the conflict, including 200,000 persons in 2002 alone. Tens of thousands of other Colombians have sought refuge abroad.

UNHCR provides legal assistance to these internally displaced persons (IDPs), supports their associations and on the national level has helped to strengthen government programmes and relevant legislation. Specialised agency programmes include education, psychological and social rehabilitation projects for children and their families and assistance to women who head households.

Colombia: Assisting the Internally Displaced

Struggling with the threat of extinction

Among Colombia's many indigenous groups threatened with extinction, few are in a riskier situation than the Tule. There are only about 1,200 of them left in three locations in the neighbouring departments of Choco and Antiquoia in north-western Colombia.

One group of 500 live in Choco's Unguia municipality, a strategically important area on the border with Panama that is rich in timber, minerals and other natural resources. Unfortunately, these riches have attracted the attention of criminal and illegal armed groups over the past decade.

Many tribe members have sought shelter in Panama or elsewhere in Choco. But a determined core decided to stay, fearing that the tribe would never survive if they left their ancestral lands and gave up their traditional way of life.

UNHCR has long understood and sympathized with such concerns, and the refugee agency has helped draw up a strategy to prevent displacement, or at least ensure that the Tule never have to leave their territory permanently.

Struggling with the threat of extinction

Nansen Refugee Award: Butterflies with New Wings

In a violence-ridden corner of Colombia, a group of courageous women are putting their lives at risk helping survivors of displacement and sexual violence. In a country where 5.7 million people have been uprooted by conflict, they live in one of the most dangerous cities - Buenaventura. Colombia's main port has one of the highest rates of violence and displacement, due to escalating rivalries between armed groups. To show their power or to exact revenge, the groups often violate and abuse the most vulnerable - women and children.

But in Buenaventura, the women who make up "Butterflies" are standing up and helping the survivors. They provide one-on-one support for victims of abuse and reach into different communities to educate and empower women and put pressure on the authorities to uphold women's rights.

Many of Butterflies' members have been forcibly displaced during the past 50 years of conflict, or have lost relatives and friends. Many are also survivors of domestic and sexual violence. It is this shared experience that pushes them to continue their work in spite of the risks.

On foot or by bus, Gloria Amparello , Maritza Asprilla Cruz and Mery Medina - three of the Butterflies coordinators - visit the most dangerous neighbourhoods and help women access medical and psychological care or help them report crimes. Through workshops, they teach women about their rights and how to earn a living. So far, Butterflies volunteers have helped more than 1,000 women and their families.

Butterflies has become a driving force in raising awareness about the high levels of violence against women. Despite attracting the attention of armed groups, they organize protests against abuse of women in the streets of their dilapidated city, determined to knock down walls of fear and silence.

Nansen Refugee Award: Butterflies with New Wings

Colombia: Indigenous People Under ThreatPlay video

Colombia: Indigenous People Under Threat

Violence in parts of Colombia is threatening the existence of the country's indigenous people. This is the tale of one such group, the Tule.
Colombia: Giving women strengthPlay video

Colombia: Giving women strength

In the volatile southern Colombian region of Putumayo, forced displacement remains a real and daily threat. Indigenous women are especially vulnerable. A project by UNHCR focuses on helping women to adapt and learn about their rights while they are displaced.
Surviving in the City: Bogota, ColombiaPlay video

Surviving in the City: Bogota, Colombia

Conflict has forced more than 3 million Colombians to flee their homes and seek shelter elsewhere in the country. The majority have migrated to cities seeking anonymity, safety and a way to make a living. But many find urban life traumatizing.
Colombia: Land Rights and the DisplacedPlay video

Colombia: Land Rights and the Displaced

Almost 80 percent of those displaced by violence in Colombia come from rural areas. Through a new initiative, the UN refugee agency is helping to restore land rights to the displaced.
Colombia's Invisible CrisisPlay video

Colombia's Invisible Crisis

UN High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres visits Colombia and Ecuador to see first hand the living conditions of some of the millions of Colombians displaced by conflict in the South American country.
Colombia Land RightsPlay video

Colombia Land Rights

Almost 80 percent of those displaced by violence in Colombia come from rural areas. Through a new initiative, the UN refugee agency is helping to restore land rights to the displaced.
Learning As A RefugePlay video

Learning As A Refuge

In Colombia, the decades-long conflict makes getting an education nearly impossible for those displaced by the violence. In rural areas, families are constantly on the move. Children often miss class and find it hard to catch up. Now there are efforts to help displaced youngsters get a proper education and to offer them a haven from the conflict.